Entrapment Neuropathy…Pain By Any Other Name

 


Ever heard of carpal tunnel syndrome?

Repetitive motion disorder?

Nerve compression syndrome?

How about a “trapped nerve”?

Chances are, you’ve probably heard of at least one of these conditions.

These medical conditions are entrapment neuropathies.

Entrapment neuropathies or compression neuropathies are a type of peripheral neuropathy caused by direct pressure on one nerve.  The pressure can be caused by trauma or injury to the specific nerve, repetitive use of a specific part of the body, a cast or brace that doesn’t fit properly or just frequently sitting with your arm over the back of a chair.

If you’re experiencing[1]

–           A burning or stinging pain in one part of your body

–           Tingling

–           Numbness

–           Muscle weakness

You could be suffering from entrapment neuropathy.  To avoid permanent nerve damage, you need to see a doctor immediately, like your local NeuropathyDR® clinician, for proper diagnosis and treatment.

What Exactly Causes Entrapment Neuropathy?

You might be wondering why something as simple as sitting with your elbows on the table all the time can cause entrapment neuropathy for you but your Uncle Harry worked in a coal mine for 40 years swinging a pick axe and never had a problem with his arms, back or anything else.

Entrapment neuropathy occurs when some kind of external pressure disrupts the flow of blood through vessels that supply specific nerves.[2] This oxygen starvation can sometimes occur because of internal problems as well such as lesions, cysts or tumors or even substantial weight gain. When this happens over and over again, the nerve is starved of its oxygen supply and becomes damaged and eventually scarred.  Once this happens, it no longer functions properly.

If you have a chronic condition like diabetes[3] that already compromises your blood flow, the fact that Uncle Harry never had these issues and you do is probably more indicative of your overall physical condition than genetics.  Your body is just more susceptible to this type of injury.  You need to be more mindful of how you move and use whichever part of your body is affected.

How Will My NeuropathyDR® Diagnose Entrapment Neuropathy?

The symptoms you report will vary depending upon which part of your body is affected by entrapment neuropathy.  Your condition will probably start with tingling or pain in the nerves followed by loss of sensation or numbness.  Muscle weakness will be the last to develop and usually occurs because the muscles have atrophied due to lack of use (i.e., your hand hurts so you stop using it as much).

Entrapment or compression neuropathy can usually be diagnosed based on symptoms.  Be sure you keep a good record of when and how your symptoms started.

Your NeuropathyDR® clinician will probably use nerve conduction studies to confirm the diagnosis and rule out the involvement of other nerves.  If entrapment neuropathy is suspected, your health care provider will then order an MRI to determine which nerve is damaged, how badly and to see if an internal issue such as a tumor or cyst is putting pressure on the nerve.

It is vitally important that you choose a health care provider with the clinical skills and experience to recognize your symptoms for what they are and distinguish them from other diseases.  Entrapment neuropathies can mimic other conditions and vice versa. The longer it takes to get the appropriate diagnosis and treatment, like the treatment protocol used exclusively by NeuropathyDR® clinicians, the more likely you are to have permanent nerve damage.

Treating Entrapment Neuropathy

If your NeuropathyDR® clinician determines that an underlying medical issue is causing your entrapment neuropathy, such as a tumor, cyst, inflammation or even weight gain, steps will be taken to first treat that condition.

If a tumor or cyst is the underlying problem, surgery may be ordered to remove the growth.  If you have issues with inflammation or weight gain, your NeuropathyDR® clinician will work with you to design a weight loss program and nutrition plan to resolve either of these issues.

The nutrition counseling provided by your NeuropathyDR® clinician is part of an overall lifestyle modification plan that will help you control your weight and increase your physical activity, within your abilities, to reduce the likelihood of your entrapment neuropathy causing permanent nerve damage or recurring once your immediate problem is taken care of.

In concert with these two steps to treat your entrapment neuropathy, your NeuropathyDR® clinician will also prescribe manual manipulation to readjust your skeletal structure and nerve pathways and nerve stimulation therapy to assist your damaged nerve in healing and open up the flow of blood to help the nerves repair themselves.

All of these steps are integral parts of the exclusive NeuropathyDR® designed specifically for the treatment of peripheral neuropathies, including entrapment neuropathies in all its forms.

For more information on coping with entrapment neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

Autonomic Neuropathy – Silent and Serious


 

Do any of these symptoms sound familiar?

∙           Dizziness and fainting when you stand up

∙           Difficulty digesting food and feeling really full when you’ve barely eaten anything

∙           Abnormal perspiration – either sweating excessively or barely at all

∙           Intolerance for exercise – no, not that you just hate it but your heart rate doesn’t adjust as it should

∙           Slow pupil reaction so that your eyes don’t adjust quickly to changes in light

∙           Urinary problems like difficulty starting or inability to completely empty your bladder

If they do, you could have autonomic neuropathy. Especially if you have diabetes, your immune system is compromised by chemotherapy, HIV/AIDS, Parkinson’s disease, lupus, Guillian-Barre or any other chronic medical condition.

You need to see a doctor immediately.  A good place to start would be a physician well versed in diagnosing and treating nerve disease and damage, like your local NeuropathyDR® clinician.

What Is Autonomic Neuropathy?

Autonomic neuropathy in itself is not a disease[1].  It’s a type of peripheral neuropathy that affects the nerves that control involuntary body functions like heart rate, blood pressure, digestion and perspiration.  The nerves are damaged and don’t function properly leading to a break down of the signals between the brain and the parts of the body affected by the autonomic nervous system like the heart, blood vessels, digestive system and sweat glands.

That can lead to your body being unable to regulate your heart rate or your blood pressure, an inability to properly digest your food, urinary problems, even being unable to sweat in order to cool your body down when you exercise.

Often, autonomic neuropathy is caused by other diseases or medical conditions so if you suffer from

∙           Diabetes

∙           Alcoholism

∙           Cancer

∙           Systemic lupus

∙           Parkinson’s disease

∙           HIV/AIDS

Or any number of other chronic illnesses, you stand a much higher risk of developing autonomic neuropathy.[2] Your best course of action is not to wait until you develop symptoms.  Begin a course of preventative treatment and monitoring with a NeuropathyDR® clinician to lessen your chances of developing autonomic neuropathy.

How Will My NeuropathyDR® Diagnose My Autonomic Neuropathy?

If you have diabetes, cancer, HIV/AIDs or any of the other diseases or chronic conditions that can cause autonomic neuropathy, it’s much easier to diagnose autonomic neuropathy.  After all, as a specialist in nerve damage and treatment, your NeuropathyDR®  is very familiar with your symptoms and the best course of treatment.

If you have symptoms of autonomic neuropathy and don’t have any of the underlying conditions, your diagnosis will be a little tougher but not impossible.

Either way, your NeuropathyDR® clinician will take a very thorough history and physical.  Make sure you have a list of all your symptoms, when they began, how severe they are, what helps your symptoms or makes them worse, and any and all medications your currently take (including over the counter medications, herbal supplements or vitamins).

Be honest with your NeuropathyDR® clinician about your diet, alcohol intake, frequency of exercise, history of drug use and smoking.  If you don’t tell the truth, you’re not giving your NeuropathyDR® clinician a clear picture of your physical condition.  That’s like asking them to drive you from Montreal to Mexico City without a map or a GPS.  You may eventually get to where you want to be, but it’s highly unlikely.

Once your history and physical are completed, your NeuropathyDR® clinician will order some tests. Depending upon your actual symptoms and which systems seem to be affected, these tests might include:

∙           Ultrasound

∙           Urinalysis and bladder function tests

∙           Thermoregulatory and/or QSART sweat tests

∙           Gastrointestinal tests

∙           Breathing tests

∙           Tilt-table tests (to test your heart rate and blood pressure regulation)

Once your tests are completed and your NeuropathyDR® clinician determines you have autonomic neuropathy, it’s time for treatment.

Treatment and Prognosis

NeuropathyDR® clinicians are well versed in treating all types of peripheral neuropathy, including autonomic neuropathy.  They adhere to a very specialized treatment protocol that was developed specifically for patients suffering from neuropathy.  That’s why their treatments have been so successful – neuropathy in all its forms is what they do.

Autonomic neuropathy is a chronic condition but it can be treated and you can do things to help relieve your symptoms.

Your NeuropathyDR® clinician will work with you and your other physicians to treat your neuropathy and manage your underlying condition.  They do this through:

∙           Diet Planning and Nutritional Support

You need to give your body the nutrition it needs to heal.

If you have gastrointestinal issues caused by autonomic neuropathy, you need to make  sure you’re getting enough fiber and fluids to help your body function properly.

If you have diabetes, you need to follow a diet specifically designed for diabetics and  to control your blood sugar.

If your autonomic neuropathy affects your urinary system, you need to retrain your bladder.  You can do this by following a schedule of when to drink and when to empty your bladder to slowly increase your bladder’s capacity.

∙          Individually Designed Exercise Programs

If you experience exercise intolerance or blood pressure problems resulting from  autonomic neuropathy, you have to be every careful with your exercise program.  Make sure that you don’t overexert yourself, take it slowly.  Your NeuropathyDR® clinician  can design an exercise program specifically for you that will allow you to exercise but             won’t push you beyond what your body is capable of.  And, even more importantly, they will continually monitor your progress and adjust your program as needed.

∙           Lifestyle Modifications

If your autonomic neuropathy causes dizziness when you stand up, then do it slowly and in stages.  Flex your feet or grip your hands several times before you attempt to stand to  increase the flow of blood to your hands and feet.  Try just sitting on the side of your bed in the morning for a few minutes before you try to stand.

Change the amount and frequency of your meals if you have digestive problems.

Don’t try to do everything all at once.  Decide what really needs to be done each day and do what you can.  Autonomic neuropathy is a chronic disorder and living with any chronic condition requires adaptations.  Your NeuropathyDR® clinician knows this all too well and will work with you to manage your level of stress and change your daily routines to help you manage your condition and your life.

All of these changes in conjunction with medications, where needed, will make it easier to live with autonomic neuropathy and lessen the chances of serious complications.  Early intervention with a NeuropathyDR® clinician is still the best policy if you have any of the underlying conditions that can cause autonomic neuropathy.  But if you already have symptoms, start treatment immediately.

For more information on coping with autonomic neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

 

 

 

 

Is Your Diet Affecting Your Neuropathy?

The next time you have a headache…

Or indigestion…

Or even muscle cramps or twitching…

Go online and “Google” any of those terms and see what you come up with.

I’m willing to bet you’ll be terrified by the results.

For headache you’ll see anything from brain tumor to bleeding in the brain to meningitis and encephalitis.

Indigestion will lead you to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), peptic ulcer disease, cancer, or even abnormality of the pancreas or bile ducts.

And muscle cramps or twitching will run the gamut from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease to ALS (also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease).

Your search will also give you the more common reasons for any of these symptoms.  Many people latch on to the more dramatic reasons and begin living like every day is their last.[1]

Others will downplay symptoms, assume that they have something simple to treat and go to the corner drug store and buy whatever over the counter remedy “seems” to treat their symptoms.

Either of these reactions could be courting disaster.  Especially if you have a condition that can lead to peripheral neuropathy.  Delaying treatment with your local NeuropathyDR® clinician can lead to severe lifelong nerve damage that will destroy your quality of life.

Expecting the Worst

If you fall into the “I know I’m dying” category, you will probably begin doctor shopping.  Going from specialist to specialist looking for someone to confirm the worst.  Even beyond the physical damage the stress of this process can do to your body, your emotional well-being is destroyed.

You live day to day expecting the worst with the specter of the Grim Reaper hanging over your shoulder.  That is no way to live.

The first thing you need to do is make appointment with your primary care provider, preferably a NeuropathyDR® clinician.  Tell them your symptoms and let them do some diagnostic testing.  If the results warrant it, they will get you started on a treatment protocol to not only alleviate your symptoms but treat the root cause of your medical problem.  The NeuropathyDR® treatment protocol includes nutrition counseling, diet planning, stress management techniques, and hands on adjustment to properly align your nervous system.

If you actually do have a serious condition, the earlier you start this process, the better off you’ll be.  The earlier you receive treatment for any condition that can lead to peripheral neuropathy, the less your chances of permanent nerve damage.

Ignoring the Obvious

The other end of the spectrum is the patient who does their own research, opts for the condition easily treatable with over the counter meds, and puts off seeing a specialist until their symptoms are much worse.

Let’s take the muscle twitching or cramping symptom as an example.  Yes, this could be caused by overworking the muscle or even a vitamin deficiency.   Either of those are easy to fix.

But what if it’s something more serious?

If the condition lasts longer than a few days, you need to see your local NeuropathyDR® clinician. You could have a condition leading to peripheral neuropathy.  Failing to treat the underlying cause quickly can lead to lasting nerve damage, muscle degeneration, and ultimately, even amputation of the affected limb.[2]

Something as simple as seeing a specialist well versed in conditions affecting the bones, muscles and bones, like your local NeuropathyDR® clinician, can make the difference between life in a wheelchair and getting back to normal quickly.

Cyberchondria vs. Informed Caution

Before you think we’re advocating running to the doctor every time you have a hang nail, that is definitely not the case.  We’re not advocating the spread of Cyberchondria[3] (i.e., the rising epidemic of online diagnosis and treatment), just asking that you approach any medical condition with informed caution.

An informed and educated patient is a gift for any physician.  Informed patients are much more likely to participate in their own care and keep their physician apprised of any changes in their condition.  That’s a win for both sides.

Instead of using the internet as a tool to diagnose (or, in many cases, misdiagnose) your own conditions, choose to use it as a means of educating yourself enough to provide your health care provider with all the information he needs to accurately and quickly diagnose your illness.

You’ll be making your life, and your NeuropathyDR® clinician’s life, much easier.

For more information on coping with your peripheral neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

 

The Power of Nutrition in Healing Postherpetic Neuropathy

 

When you were diagnosed with shingles, you thought that as soon as the rash disappeared you would be free and clear…

You didn’t count on the nerve damage and pain you’re still dealing with.

The pain of postherpetic neuropathy.

You’re frustrated…depressed…irritable.

Yes, you know you can take pain medications to help ease some of the discomfort but you don’t want to do that forever.

The good news is that there are other things you can do to help your body heal.  With a little patience, perseverance and the help of medical professionals well versed in dealing with postherpetic neuropathy, like your local NeuropathyDR™ specialist, you can live a normal life again.

It Starts With Good Nutrition

The human body is a very well designed machine.  If you put junk into it, you get junk out of it.  But if you give it what it needs to function properly and to repair itself, the results can be awe inspiring.

The very first thing you need to do is make sure you’re giving your body the right tools to fight back against postherpetic neuropathy.  And that means a healthy diet.

Your diet should include[1]:

–           Whole grains and legumes to provide B vitamins to promote nerve health.  Whole grains promote the production of serotonin in the brain and will increase your feeling of well-being.

–           Fish and eggs for additional vitamins B12 and B1.

–           Green, leafy vegetables (spinach, kale, and other greens) for calcium and magnesium.   Both of these nutrients are vital to healthy nerve endings and health nerve impulse  transmission and, as an added bonus, they give your immune system a boost.

–           Yellow and orange fruits and vegetables (such as squash, carrots, yellow and orange bell  peppers, apricots, oranges, etc.) for vitamins A and C to help repair your skin and boost  your immune system.

–           Sunflower seeds (unsalted), avocados, broccoli, almonds, hazelnuts, pine nuts, peanuts (unsalted), tomatoes and tomato products, sweet potatoes and fish for vitamin E to promote skin health and ease the pain of postherpetic neuropathy.

–           Ask your neuropathy specialist for recommendations on a good multivitamin and mineral supplement to fill in any gaps in your nutrition plan.

Foods you should avoid[2]:

–           Coffee and other caffeinated drinks.

–           Fried foods and all other fatty foods.  Fatty foods suppress the immune system and that’s the last thing you need when you’re fighting postherpetic neuropathy.

–           Cut back on animal protein.  That’s not to say you should become a vegetarian.  Just limit the amount of animal protein you take in.  High-protein foods elevate the amount of  dopamine and norepinephrine which are both tied to high levels of anxiety and stress.

–           Avoid drinking alcohol.  Alcohol consumption limits the ability of the liver to remove toxins from the body and can make a bad situation worse.

–           Avoid sugar.  You don’t have to eliminate sweets completely, just control them.  Sugar contains no essential nutrients and “gunks up” your system.  Keeping your blood sugar level constant will help control your irritability.

–           Control your salt intake.  Opt for a salt substitute with potassium instead of sodium and stay away from preserved foods like bacon, ham, pickles, etc.  Reducing the amount of  salt you eat will help ease inflammation and that alone will work wonders in the healing process.

Talk to your local NeuropathyDR™ treatment specialist for a personalized diet plan to help you to help your body to heal with the right nutritional support for postherpetic neuropathy.

Give Your Body A Break by Managing Stress

We all know that stress is a killer.  But few of us really take steps to manage the stress in our lives.  By keeping your stress level under control, you give your body a chance to use the resources it was using to deal with stress to actually heal itself.

Some tips for managing your stress level:

–           Exercise regularly.  You don’t have to get out and run a marathon.  Just walk briskly for about 15 minutes a day, every day, to start.  You can build from there.

–           Employ relaxation techniques such as deep breathing, tai chi, yoga or meditation.  Any of these will calm the mind and, in turn, calm the body and nerves.

–          Find a hobby that will take your mind off your pain.
Ask your local NeuropathyDR™ clinician for suggestions and make stress management a part of your treatment plan to overcome postherpetic neuropathy. But remember, healing is a process not an event.  Be patient with yourself and start the healing process today.

We hope this gives you some tips to get started on the road to putting postherpetic neuropathy behind you.  Working with your medical team, including your local NeuropathyDR™ specialist, to design a nutrition and treatment plan tailored to your specific needs is a great place to start.

For more information on recovering from shingles and postherpetic neuropathy, get our Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.


[1] http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/shingles/default.htm

 

[2] http://www.healingwithnutrition.com/sdisease/shingles/shingles.html

Nutrition Support for the Cancer Patient


If you’ve been diagnosed with cancer, no one has to tell you how devastating that diagnosis can be…

Your life literally changes overnight…

You’re faced with the reality of treatment and that usually means

∙           Surgery

∙           Chemotherapy

∙           Radiation

∙           Experimental treatments including possible hormone therapy

And all the side effects that come with each of those cancer treatment options.

If you’re a cancer or post chemotherapy patient and you suffer from

∙           Loss of appetite

∙           Nausea

∙           Post chemotherapy peripheral neuropathy, including nerve pain and/or balance and gait issues

∙           Dry mouth

You may be missing a very important piece of the cancer recovery puzzle…

Nutritional support for cancer treatment and recovery.

Trying to recover from cancer without giving your body what it needs to build itself back up is like trying to rebuild a house after a tornado without 2×4’s and nails.

If your body doesn’t have the essential materials it needs to heal, no medical treatment has any hope of succeeding.

Granted, food may not sound appealing right now.  Talk to your medical team to put together a cancer recovery diet plan that will make food taste good and give you the nutrients you need to heal.

Here are some things to think about when designing a cancer recovery nutrition program:

Basic Cancer Nutrition Tips[1]

If you’ve undergone chemotherapy or you’re preparing to, you need to support your immune system.  Your best option for doing that is a diet rich in whole foods that are easy on the digestive system.  Make sure your cancer recovery diet includes foods that are high in anti-oxidants and protein.  Your diet plan should include foods rich in vitamins, especially vitamins C, D and E and nutrients like soy isoflavones, amino acids, folic acid, l-glutamine, calcium and carotenoids.  Drink as much water as possible and don’t worry about keeping your calorie count low.  This is the time to take in all the calories you need.

Chemotherapy and radiation may affect your ability to digest foods so invest in a good food processor and/or juicer.  Both of these tools will allow you to prepare foods that are easy to ingest and digest while still getting the nutrition you need.

Try These Foods To Rebuild Your Body[2]

It’s easy to say “eat foods that are high in vitamins” but you may not know exactly which foods you need.  Here are some suggestions for foods to aid in your cancer recovery and chemotherapy symptoms:

Vitamin C

∙           Red cabbage

∙           Kiwi fruit

∙           Oranges

∙           Red and Green Bell Peppers

∙           Potatoes

Vitamin D

∙           Salmon and tuna

Vitamin E

∙           Nuts, including almonds and peanuts

∙           Avocados

∙           Broccoli

Carotenoids

∙           Apricots

∙           Carrots

∙           Greens, especially collard greens and spinach

∙           Sweet potatoes

Soy Isoflavones

∙           Soybeans

∙           Tofu

∙           Soy milk – this could also be helpful if you need to go lactose-free

Folic Acid

∙           Asparagus

∙           Dried beans

∙           Beets

∙           Brussels sprouts

∙           Garbanzo beans

∙           Lentils

∙           Turkey

These are just a few examples.  Talk to your local NeuropathyDR™ clinician for a specially prepared diet plan that incorporates all the foods you need to rebuild your immune system.

Use Herbs and Spices to Give Your Food More Flavor

Herbs and spices are a natural way to flavor your food without adding man-made chemicals.  And many herbs have natural medicinal properties of their own.  Try some of these to make your food taste better:

∙           Cinnamon

∙           Basil

∙           Coriander

∙           Cumin

∙           Ginger (natural anti-inflammatory properties, too)

∙           Garlic

∙           Mint (great for fighting nausea as well)

∙           Fennel

∙           Turmeric

We hope this gives you the basic knowledge you need to talk with your health care team, including your local NeuropathyDR™ treatment specialist about cancer recovery nutrition and your pre and post chemotherapy diet.  Working with your medical team to design a cancer recovery diet plan that works for you will ensure that you’re not neglecting the missing piece of the cancer recovery puzzle – good nutrition.

For more information on cancer recovery nutrition and coping with the symptoms of your cancer treatment, including peripheral neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.


[1] www.cancer.org/Treatment/SurvivorshipDuringandAfterTreatment

 

[2] www.mayoclinic.com/health/cancer-survivor

Neuropathy and Nutrition

If you suffer from peripheral neuropathy brought on by any of these medical issues:

·           Diabetes

·           Post-chemotherapy

·           Shingles

·           Guillian Barre Syndrome

·           Lyme Disease

Or any one of a multitude of other health problems and your over-the-counter or even prescribed medication isn’t helping, you may be overlooking a very important link in the management of your neuropathy and your neuropathy pain.  You may be missing a key element in your peripheral neuropathy treatment plan.

Look at what you’re feeding your body.

Many of the side effects from peripheral neuropathy you’re experiencing can be brought under control or possibly eliminated by following a good nutrition plan.

What Exactly Is “Good Nutrition”?

We hear so much today about the value of a good diet yet few people actually think about what they feed their bodies on a daily basis and what that food does to them.

A good way of thinking about it is “garbage in, garbage out”.  It’s like putting a really cheap grade of gas into a Formula One race car.  It may fuel the car, for maybe 100 feet from the starting line, but after that, the engine will sputter, stall and eventually just stop.  It certainly won’t run at peak performance.

The same thing happens over time when we put bad food into our bodies.  People who suffer from peripheral neuropathy are even more susceptible to the effects of poor nutrition.

Good nutrition involves putting the right mix of nutrients in the right amounts into your body.  The right mix of protein, good fats, carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals (and staying properly hydrated) all comprise a good diet.  Even if you’re eating enough during the day, if you’re not getting the right mix of the ingredients that your body needs to function, you could be suffering from malnutrition.

Malnutrition leads to a host of medical problems and sometimes serious diseases, including diabetes.  If you already suffer from peripheral neuropathy, you’re just making the problem worse by not giving your body the basic building blocks it needs to repair itself.

All the medications in every big pharmaceutical lab on the planet won’t fix your body if you don’t give it what it needs to fix itself.

The Link Between Nutrition and Neuropathy Treatment

Food is fuel.  It’s what the body needs to function properly and support us in our daily lives. If you’re eating a healthy diet and giving the body what it needs to support you and take care of itself, it can not only lessen the effects of your neuropathy, it can even help you avoid other complications.

Unless you’ve been living in a cave for the last 20 or 30 years, you know the benefits of a healthy diet.  Significant medical evidence has shown that, especially in the elderly and diabetics (two populations with a high incidence of neuropathy), a healthy diet can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, even certain types of cancer.

If you already suffer from neuropathy and you develop any of these other complications, your condition will be even more serious than for someone who doesn’t suffer from neuropathy.

For example, you already know that neuropathy can affect your sense of touch.

A further complication of that loss of sensation is that it can make it more likely that you will fall and possibly suffer broken bones.  If your body doesn’t have the materials available internally to help mend those bones, your healing process can be severely compromised.

Even if your neuropathy is being treated with NeuropathyDR™ systems or other medical intervention, you still need a healthy diet to give your body and your mind what it needs to heal itself.  It will help you keep your energy level high for your therapy sessions, keep your mind sharp to follow the doctor’s instructions and may even eliminate the need for medications with serious side effects.

NeuropathyDR™ Clinicians are up to date on the best diets for your particular case. Keep in mind that we’ll also typically recommend oral and sometimes topical nutrition supplements and dietary programs.

Does What You Eat Really Affect Your Neuropathy?

In a word, yes.  If you want to be healthy and control or even stop disease, you have to eat a healthy diet.  You can’t continue to put junk into your body and not expect the body to deteriorate.  Especially if you already suffer from any of the health problems that lead to neuropathy.

One of the main components in diabetic neuropathy is metabolic syndrome.  And that’s brought on by high blood sugar  levels, high fat levels in the blood, and low insulin.  If you’re not putting foods into your body that create those problems, you’ve already won half the battle.

Even beyond the blood sugar issues faced by diabetics, other neuropathy sufferers can be affected by diet as well.  If you suffer from neuropathy, regardless of whether or not you have diabetes, here are some other problems you may be facing due to your diet:

  • Vitamin deficiencies – One of the most common is the lack of B-12.  Even if you ‘re taking a supplement, your body may not be absorbing it properly and that can cause anemia and/or nervous system disorders.  Talk to your NeuropathyDR™ Clinician about testing and what you can do to make sure you’re getting the right vitamins and minerals in the right amounts.
  • Alcohol abuse – In addition to what excessive use of alcohol does to the liver and kidneys, it can also lead to nutritional deficiencies because your body doesn’t properly absorb what you put into it.  If you suffer from any form of neuropathy, your best course of action is to lay off alcohol.
  • Cancer – Studies have found a direct relation between certain types of cancer and poor diet and lack of antioxidants.  Also, if you smoke, stop now.  Cancer is one of the leading  risks of smoking and other unhealthy habits but if you have neuropathy and you smoke, you’re a ticking time bomb.

Above all else, the best way to help your body fight your neuropathy symptoms is to give it the tools it needs to do it.  Talk to your local NeuropathyDR™ Clinician about what you can do, in addition to their treatment, to feed your body well and give yourself everything you need to repair your body and fight your neuropathy symptoms.

Subscribe to our Weekly Ezine at “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com to get your life back.

How Do I Know If I Have Peripheral Neuropathy?

Knowing if you have peripheral neuropathy  should be very straightforward. Unfortunately, patients with peripheral neuropathy suffer greatly. In my experience and the experience of many physicians, patients have symptoms for years, which gradually build to a crescendo before they present to our offices.

These symptoms initially may include such things as mild loss of sensation of the hands and the feet, progressive  worsening of tingling and numbness that will oftentimes wake the patient at night, or completely disturbed sleep.

We also find that many patients with peripheral neuropathy have a combination of these most annoying symptoms. This could include not only the presence of tingling and numbness but shooting pains. I have had many patients tell me that one of the most annoying symptoms, especially in colder climates, is the coolness of the feet as well as the (trophic) changes that occur in the skin.  Sometimes, that is extreme dryness, cracking, fragility etc.

The diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy really is a diagnosis of exclusion. I tell my doctors this all the time. It is very important to have a doctor working with you, who is able to perform the most thorough evaluation possible,  evaluate all most your records to make sure that all correctible causes of peripheral neuropathy have been addressed. If a root cause can be identified it should be addressed as completely as is medically and humanly possible.

A diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy is more about making sure of everything it’s not. Therefore, our client doctors who take care of peripheral neuropathy patients commonly work with many physicians of other disciplines. The reasons for this should be quite obvious. It is very important that all the things we spoke about earlier, such as family history, genetics, medication usage, etc are all accounted for.

We also have to be on the lookout for iatrogenically caused neuropathy from medical care such as chemotherapy for cancer or other illnesses.

Another area which concerns me greatly is when patients self-medicate with over-the-counter medications or maybe even herbal preparations that possibly could be contaminated with heavy metals or plant toxins. I strongly advise you to seek professional counseling before creating irreversible damage to your liver or kidneys.

Hope for Inclusion Body Myositis?

Recently we discharged to home care a patient with neuropathy and weakness secondary to Inclusion Body Myositis, an inflammatory muscle disease with sensory and strength changes (weakness). As far as I am aware, there is no known cure.

In no way am I suggesting curative care was achieved. But this patient was 20% better in just five weeks, and this is after 2-3 years of standard interventions. The most striking gain though was in proximal lower extremity muscle strength gains, which objectively improved substantially off base-line measurements.

We modified our ND Protocols to include enhanced anti-inflammatory activity by boosting glutathione levels (a master detoxification system in the human body) and increasing EPA (the most anti-inflammatory Omega 3 EFA) levels, monitoring vitamin D levels, and a few other tweaks.

The best thing about our work is to see patients like this respond, and that gives us both hope, and reason to explore how we can help more people with similar illnesses.

More Patients respond…

In this group of 4, we have different case types. Metabolic Syndrome, Diabetic Neuropathy, Bilateral Mechanical Neuropathy (following an acute disc herniation), and an Idiopathic Neuropathy (meaning the cause could not be determined with accuracy.)

That fact that ALL these cases respond well to similar protocols with minor variations, and continue to do so, lends significant understanding that will help millions find quality of life and relief at last.

Why the Neuopathies behave similarly, according to David Phillips, PhD.

“My entire experience has been extremely positive, the atmosphere is excellent, as is the staff!”
-Another satisfied neuropathy patient

“My experience was very positive and I look forward to my visits and always leave feeling great. I feel that Dr. Hayes’ philosophy is to make me free of pain and it is working! The staff is welcoming, positive, total top notch!”
-Paul Goguen, Rockland, MA

“My feet feel wonderful, much much better! It’s much easier to fall asleep at night without pain. The staff is great, good with accommodating my different appointments, couldn’t be friendlier!”
-Eddie Phelan, Quincy, MA

“I feel much better since beginning treatment with Dr. Hayes. The staff is excellent, definitely a 10!
-Another satisfied neuropathy patient